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nike missile site ms-70

from cold war, nuclear weapons posted in history by prof_improbable

During the Cold War from 1959 until 1972, the Twin Cities were protected by four missile battery sites. This is one of those four locations. The actual Nike-Hercules missile (or a reproduction of one) can be seen in a park in nearby St. Bonifacius.

The missiles were stored on underground rails and were brought to the surface by elevators. They were meant to bring down long-range enemy bombers.

All of the Nike sites were decommissioned on Feb. 4th, 1978.

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word origin: sardonic

from word origin posted in history by prof_improbable

Webster's dictionary defines the word sardonic as "disdainfully or skeptically humorous : derisively mocking."

The word originates from the ancient peoples of the island of Sardinia off the Italian coast (from Wikipedia):

In 2009, scientists at the University of Eastern Piedmont in Italy claimed to have identified hemlock water dropwort (Oenanthe crocata) as the plant responsible for producing the sardonic grin.

This plant is the candidate for the "sardonic herb," which was a neurotoxic plant used for the ritual killing of elderly people in pre-Roman Sardinia. When these people were unable to support themselves, they were intoxicated with this herb and then dropped from a high rock or beaten to death.


That is so totally metal.

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bataclan theatre

from terrorism posted in history by prof_improbable

Built in 1864 and opened in 1865, the Bataclan is a café-concert theatre built in the Chinoiserie (European version of Chinese) style. With historical appearances by notable figures as diverse as Buffalo Bill Cody and Edith Piaf, the Bataclan has been hosting rock acts since the 1970s.

The theatre was the scene of a coordinated terrorist attacks on Nov. 13, 2015, killing 89 people and injuring over 200. The members of the band that evening, Eagles of Death Metal, were interviewed after the attack for Vice.

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scourmount abbey

from beer, brewing, chimay posted in history by prof_improbable

The life in this monastery is characterized by prayer, reading, and labor. Not a bad day if you get to drink Chimay Ale, which has been made at this Trappist monastery since 1862.

The brothers use the profits from the operation to support their monastery and surrounding charities.

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malaga island

from civil rights posted in history by prof_improbable

Although many aspects of its history seem to be obscured, Malaga Island was the site of a mixed-race community from the Civil War until their forced expulsion in 1912.

The black and white settlers had formed a fishing village with a school on the island, and they lived peacefully for 50 years until the state of Maine purchased the island in 1911.

The idea of a mixed community was at odds with the prevailing eugenics theory of the area, and local and state politicians used the Malaga Island community as a wedge issue.

Eight settlers were committed to the Maine School for the Feeble-Minded. The remaining 45 residents were evicted from the island, their school was moved to a different island, and Malaga Island's graveyard was dug up and redeposited on the mainland.

Source: Malaga Island: A Story Best Left Untold radio documentary and Strange Fruit, Volume I graphic novel by Joel Christian Gill

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