popturf

the replacements

posted in music

cc club

from the replacements posted in music by prof_improbable

A beloved stalwart dive bar in the increasingly yuppified Uptown neighborhood of Minneapolis, the CC Club was the inspiration for The Replacements song "Here Comes a Regular" off their 1985 album Tim.

The Replacements, Hüsker Dü, Soul Asylum (and pretty much every other Twin Cities band) used to hang out here regularly- the record store Oar Folkjokeopus, which is now Treehouse Records, is across the street.

It's a good place to go when you've worked up "a mean, mean thirst after a hard day of nothin' much at all."

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the stinson house

from the replacements posted in music by pete_nice

Bob Stinson used to live at this house in the Uptown neighborhood of Minneapolis with his younger brother, Tommy. Around 1978, Bob bought Tommy a bass guitar to help keep him out of trouble, and the two started to practice with drummer Chris Mars.

Paul Westerberg was a janitor at a senator's office downtown, and he would walk by the house daily and hear them practicing. After auditioning a number of other singers, Westerberg was hired as lead vocals/second guitarist in 1979.

The group was initially called Dogbreath. They played one drunken show as The Impediments, and the promoter of the show threatened to have them banned from every venue in town. So they changed their name to The Replacements...

The cover of The Replacment's Let It Be was shot at this location.

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sons of norway

from the replacements posted in music by pete_nice

According to Minneapolis musician and City Pages writer Jim Walsh, the Replacements played a high school dance at this building back in the day. He is fairly certain that the line "we are the sons of no one" from "Bastards of Young" comes from that experience. Also according to Walsh, the 'Mats refused to help carry other band's equipment.


The Sons of Norway is a Norwegian fraternal benefit society that now houses a Wells Fargo branch.

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replacements’ guitarist deathplace

from the replacements posted in music by prof_improbable

Bob Stinson, lead guitarist for the legendary rock band the Replacements, died in an apartment above this address on 2/18/95.
Despite reports to the contrary, Stinson did not die of an overdose, but as the coroner reported, "...rather his body simply wore out after years of abuse."

This location is referenced in Chuck Klosterman's, "Killing Yourself to Live."

R.I.P.

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