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faneuil hall

from american revolution, freedom trail posted in history by pete_nice

Faneuil Hall has a bronze stature of Samuel Adams on its Congress Street side. The statue portrays the Revolutionary patriot, just after demanding that Governor Hutchinson immediately remove the British troops from Boston after the Boston Massacre.

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faneuil hall

from american revolution, freedom trail posted in history by pete_nice

Built by wealthy merchat Peter Faneuil in 1742 as a center of commerce, Faneuil Hall has since been dubbed the Cradle of Liberty for its role in a number of political and historical events.

While the first floor still contains numerous shops, the second floor meeting room is where American patriots first coined the phrase "no taxation without representation" in response to the Sugar and Stamp Tax Acts.

It's also where Samuel Adams railed against British occupation during the American Revolution, and where the funeral was held for victims of the Boston Massacre (also planned by Samuel Adams).

Today, Faneuil Hall is part of the Boston Freedom Trail.

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golden gate bridge

from 7 wonders posted in history by prof_improbable

Oh yeah, James Bond (Roger Moore) fought Max Zorin (Christopher Walken) on top of the Golden Gate in the 1985 Bond film A View to Kill.

Also, there is a zeppelin in the mix.

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golden gate bridge

from 7 wonders posted in history by prof_improbable

Completed in 1937, the Golden Gate Bridge is one of the American Society of Civil Engineers selected Seven Wonders of the Modern World.

The bridge connects the city of San Francisco with Marin County to its north (the first bridge to connect over the ocean), and was the bridge with longest span until 1962 (it still has the second longest main span in the United States, after the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in New York City).

Joseph Strauss was the chief engineer on the Golden Gate, and was adamant of safety precautions to limit fatalities. Strauss insisted on hard-hats well before they became de rigueur, and instituted a system of safety nets to catch falling workers.

In all, eleven construction workers died in the construction of the Golden Gate Bridge (a heretofore unheard of number for bridge construction).

Those who fell into the nets and survived formed the Halfway to Hell Club.

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old south meeting house

from american revolution, boston tea party posted in history by pete_nice

Built by Puritans in 1729, the Old South Meeting House has had a number of brushes with history. Benjamin Franklin was baptized here. Phillis Wheatley, the first published black poet in the United States, was a member, as were patriots James Otis, Thomas Cushing, and William Dawes.

On December 16, 1773, five thousand colonists piled into the Old South Meeting House to voice their frustration over British taxation. After the gathering, the Boston Tea Party occurred at nearby Griffin's Wharf.

In the 19th century, the Old South was one of the first buildings in the United States to be preserved as a historic site; leading proponents of its protection included the philanthropist Mary Hemenway, abolitionist Wendell Phillips, and the writers Julia Ward Howe and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Today, the Old South is a museum open to the public and part of the Boston Freedom Trail.

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