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mount tabor

from christianity, jesus posted in history by donkeyoti

Jesus was palling around with three disciples (Peter, James and John) while hiking a mountain, when suddenly Moses and Elijah appeared in a blinding radiance around Jesus. Then the voice of God called him Son...so all and all, it was a pretty significant trundle.

This event in Christianity is referred to as the "Transfiguration of Jesus", and it has been interpreted several different ways. Some believe that the transfiguring is the revealing of the divine to human sense perception. Another is the revelation that Jesus is the Son of God. Another still is that this really tees things up for a Crucifixion/Resurrection.

The Transfiguration event ranks much higher in the Eastern Orthodox greatest hits, but the Western church honors it through a number of celebrations.

One of the hypothesized locations for the Transfiguration is at Mount Tabor, where there are currently two churches (Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox) dedicated to Transfiguration on the summit.

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first national bank (former)

from jesse james, james-younger gang posted in history by donkeyoti

On September 7, 1876, the James-Younger gang tried to rob the Northfield First National Bank. Townspeople realized what was happening, grabbed their guns, and shot it out in the street.

The resulting body count included the bank teller, Joseph Lee Heywood, and a Swedish immigrant, Nicholas Gustafson, as well as several members of the gang.

Cole, Bob and Jim Younger fled to nearby Madelia, MN (where they were captured). Frank and Jesse James escaped into the Dakotas.

Every September, Northfield holds the Defeat of Jesse James Days, where members of the community reenact the bank robbery and have a parade.

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martin luther king, jr. birthplace

from civil rights movement, mlk posted in history by donkeyoti

On January 15, 1929, Martin Luther King, Jr. was born in this two-story Queen Anne style house owned by his maternal grandparents. Located in the neighborhood known as “Sweet Auburn," King lived here for the first twelve years of his life, while his father was pastor of the Ebeneezer Baptist Church down the street.

Today, the home has tours and is managed by the National Park Service.

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little rock central high school

from civil rights movement posted in history by donkeyoti

On September 23, 1957, the Little Rock Central High School was the focal point of the nascent civil rights movement in the United States as nine African-American students tried to enter the newly integrated public school.

The site of the first implementation of the Supreme Court's decision on Brown vs Board of Education, the nine students met consider opposition from over 1,000 white protestors who had been drummed up by then Arkansas Governor Orval Faubus. President Eisenhower had dispatched 1,200 members of the 101st Airborne Division to escort the students into the school. The Little Rock Nine entered the school and made history.

The school now houses a museum dedicated to the event, and continues to function as an educational institution to this day.

Interestingly, the Little Rock Central Band and Flag Line were selected to participate in the 2013 Presidential Inaugural Parade for Barack Obama.

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molton hotel

from civil rights posted in history by donkeyoti

Commissioner of Public Safety for the city of Birmingham, Alabama and über-racist, Eugene "Bull" Connor, liked to spend his mornings at the Molton Hotel, drinking shots of Ol' Grand-Dad bourbon at the bar.

When Martin Luther King and his entourage decided to bring the civil rights struggle to Birmingham, the plan was to get Bull Connor to "tip his hand" as a reaction to peaceful protests.

Bull Connor did. His troops responded to a walk-out of students with fire hoses and snarling German Shepherds. This was captured in photos that landed on the cover the major papers in America the next day. The civil rights movement gained support from the shocked moderates of the country, and within a year a series of civil rights laws were passed.

The Molton was torn down in 1979, replaced by the Financial Center which stands there today.

*source: David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell.

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